Case Hardening Steel and Metal

Improvement of Tribological Properties Through Nitrocarburizing

Structure, Hardness and Depth of the Nitrocarburized Layer.-case hardening-

During nitrocarburizing, a two-part surface layer is formed, initially an outer compound layer, followed by a diffusion layer below it. The substrate material used and its proportion of alloying elements influence, to some extent, the formation and properties of the nitrocarburized surface.

Case Hardening Compound Layer

The nitrogen-rich inter-metallic compound layer mainly contains iron-carbonitrides and, depending on the type and proportion of alloying elements in the base material, special nitrides.

Case Hardening : A unique feature of salt bath nitrocarburized layers is the monophase _-Fe_N compound layer, with a nitrogen content of 6-9% and a carbon content of around 1%. Compared with double phase nitride layers which have lower nitrogen concentrations, the monophase _-Fe_N layer is more ductile and gives better wear and corrosion resistance by improvement with case hardening. In metallographic analysis the compound layer is clearly definable fron the diffusion layer as a lightly etched layer. A porous area develops in the outer zone of the compound layer. The case hardness of the compound layer measured on a cross-section is around 700 HV for unalloyed steels and up to about 1600 HV on high chromium steels. Treatment durations of 1-2 hours usually yield compound layers about 10-20 _m thick (0.0004 - 0.0008"). The higher the alloy content, the thinner the layer for the same treatment cycle. Fig. 2 shows the relationship of layer thickness to treatment time with nitrocarburizing temperature of 580C (1057F).

case hardening

Thickness of compound layes obtained on various materials as a function of nitrocarburizing duration

Case Hardening : Diffusion Layer

The nitrogen penetration into the diffusion layer provides for improved fatigue strength. Depending on the initial structure and composition of the core material, the nitrogen in the diffusion layer is dissolved in the iron lattice and/or precipitated as very fine nitrides.

case hardening

Influence of chromium on diffusion layer hardness and total nitration depth in various 0.40-0.45% carbon steels

Case Hardening With unalloyed steels, the nitrogen is dissolved in the iron lattice. Due to the diminishing solubility of nitrogen in iron during slow cooling, _'-Fe4N nitrides are precipitated in the outer region of the diffusion layer, some in form of needles, which are visible in the structure under the microscope. If cooling is done quickly, the nitrogen remains in super-saturated solution. With alloyed steels which contain nitride-forming elements, the formation of stable nitrides or carbonitrides takes place in the diffusion layer independent of the cooling speed. With increasing alloy content of the steel, the diffusion layer is thinner for identical nitrocarburizing parameters. However, with their higher level of nitride-forming alloying elements these steels have a greater case hardness. Fig. 3 illustrates the influence of chromium on the hardness and depth of the diffusion layer in steels with a carbon content of 0.40 - 0.45% after 90 minutes treatment at 580C (1075F). Total nitrocarburizing depth shown in Fig. 4 is the distance to the point where the hardness of the nitride layer is equal to the core hardness. After a 90 minute treatment the total nitrided depth is about 1.0 mm (0.040") on unalloyed steel, but barely 0.2 mm (0.008") on a 12% Cr steel. (See Fig. 4.)

case hardening

Total nitrided depth on various materials resulting from nitrocarburizing

Fig. 7 shows the coefficient of friction both under dry conditions and after lubrication with SAE 30 oil, measured by an Amsler machine. All samples were lapped to a roughness of R_ = 1_m after their respective surface treatments and before testing. Without lubrication the nitrocarburized QP had the lowest coefficient of friction, being less than half of that of the hard chrome or case hardened surfaces. The lowest friction level occurred when nitrocarburized QPQ is lubricated. It is 3-4 times lower than that achieved with the chrome or martensitic surfaces.

case hardening

Coefficient of friction values for various surface layers, with and without lubrication.

Case Hardening SNC = salt bath nitrocarburized

These results show the direct effect of increased oxidation as it relates to friction on the surface of the nitrocarburized samples. The QPQ sample, with its extra post-oxidation step, has a much higher friction value than the QP specimen, which had part of its original oxidation in the compound layer removed by lapping. However, with this variant, due to the fine microporosity in the QPQ sample which causes the lubrication to adhere better to the surface, this option gives the lowest friction value.

If a uniform running behavior is required the QP process is appropriate. Lubrication has only a slight influence on the coefficient of friction because the oxide layer of the outer surface was removed during the polishing operation.

It has been determined that, unlike with chrome surfaces, the coefficient of friction of nitrocarburized QP and QPQ treated surfaces remains constant, even at varying sliding speeds.

The intermetallic stricture of the compound layer, which contains epsilon iron nitride formed during nitrocarburizing, is extremely resistant to adhesive wear and scuffing. Fig. 8 shows the scuffing loads of gears made from various materials (6). It was established by applying increasing pressure to the flank tooth until galling occurred. Austenitic steel containing 18% chromium and 8% nickel had the lowest resistance to galling, however, after nitrocarburizing its resistance was raised almost five-fold. The performance with SAE 5134 was about tripled. Even SAE 5116, which had already been carburized, more than doubled the scuffing load it could withstand through the compound layer built by the nitrocarburizing treatment.

Scuffing load limit of gears.
SNC = salt bath nitrocarburized

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